I Lived Exclusively Off Doomsday Prepper Food for a Week (From Vice)

This story appears in VICE magazine’s Dystopia and Utopia Issue. Click HERE to subscribe to VICE magazine.

After 9/11, my dad filled a duffel bag with some energy bars, a couple gallons of water, some
penicillin, and a map. Amid scaremongering headlines about imminent anthrax and “dirty
bomb” attacks in the city, he wanted to have some supplies on hand in case we needed to get out
of Brooklyn fast. Were he to assemble such a bag today, he’d likely stumble on a number of companies promising a more wholesale brand of disaster preparedness: a box full of shelf-stable freeze-dried meals, to be revived from their desiccated state with the addition of boiled water.

Freeze-dried food is nothing new. As early as the 13th century, the ancient Quechua and Aymara people of Bolivia and Peru pioneered a form of the process by exposing potatoes to the freezing temperatures of the Andes overnight, then drying them in the sun. In 1937, Nestlé used industrial technology to create the world’s first freeze-dried coffee, and in the 60s and 70s, the US military shipped freeze-dried food rations to the troops in Vietnam.

Though its light weight and long shelf life are ideal for navigating harsh conditions, freeze-dried food is probably most famous as a cultural curiosity: Like many Americans, I discovered it in a museum gift shop, gawking at the styrofoam-like ice cream that astronauts used to have for dessert. More recently, I encountered it at a disaster preparedness convention in Raleigh, North Carolina, where smiling, gray-haired preppers manned tables piled with plastic bags full of vegetables, meats, and stews.

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via Vice http://bit.ly/2lND6hA

April 11, 2018 at 07:52AM